Our Team

PUBLICATIONS >photo gilles robichaudPROFILE




1991-1995 BSc., maj. Biology / min. Biochemistry
Université de Moncton, N-B, Canada
Dean's List 1993-94, '94-95

1995-1997 MSc. Microbiology and Immunology
Université Laval, PQ, Canada

1997-2001 PhD, Microbiology-Immunology
Université Laval, PQ, Canada

2001-2003 Postdoctoral Fellowship, Molecular Oncology
Atlantic Cancer Research Institute
Moncton, N-B, Canada

2003-2006 Postdoctoral Fellowship, Catalytic RNA and suppression systems
Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada

Adjunct Professor (2006-Present)
Université de Sherbrooke, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Fleurimont, PQ, Canada

Assistant Professor (2006-2012)
Université de Moncton, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Moncton, NB, Canada

Adjunct Professor (2012-Present)
University of New Brunswick-Saint John, Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Saint John, NB, Canada

Associate Professor (2012-present)
Université de Moncton, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Moncton, NB, Canada


RESEARCH - Grants and Funds (past 5 years)
  • Christopher Gray, John Johnson and G. A. Robichaud, Operating grant: Natural Products from Canadian Medicinal Plants and Their Endophytic Fungi as Inducers of Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells, Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, June 2014, $139 200 (3 years)
  • G. A. Robichaud, RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP: Mammaglobin: A tipping point for cancer cell sensitivity, Research Assistantship Initiative, New Brunswick Innovation Foundation (NBIF) – March 2014, $25 000 (2 year)
  • G. A. Robichaud, Operating grant: Elucidating the role of Pax-5 in the metastatic cascade of breast cancer cells, Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, June 2012, $150 000 (3 years)
  • G. A. Robichaud, Establishing the molecular and cellular roles of Mammaglobin 1 in breast cancer malignancy, Breast Cancer Society of Canada/QEII Foundation, BHCRI, March 2013, $60 000 (2 years).
  • G. A. Robichaud, Mapping the Pax-5 cancerous interactome in breast cancer cells, Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR-RPPNB), New Investigator Award, Sept. 2010, $150 000 (5 years)
  • G. A. Robichaud, Characterisation and evaluation of anticancer properties of refined honey from the Tobique First Nations. Industrial Research Assistance Program, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), July 2013, $5 000 (6 months)
  • G. A. Robichaud, RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP: The elucidation of Mammaglobin-dependant sensitivity mechanisms in cancer cells, Research Assistantship Initiative, New Brunswick Innovation Foundation (NBIF) – March 2013, $15 000 (1 year)
  • G. A. Robichaud, Defining the role of Pax5 in the establishment of breast cancer metastasis, NB Health Research Foundation (NBHRF), Operating grant, Feb. 2013, $10 000 (1 year)
  • G. A. Robichaud, Development of a microscale and high throughput method to assess cell migration processes, Industrial Research Assistance Program, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), July 2012, $4 500 (6 months)
  • G. A. Robichaud, RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP: To study the role of Mammaglobin as a regulator of breast cancer progression, Research Assistantship Initiative, New Brunswick Innovation Foundation (NBIF) – April 2012, $10 000 (1 year)
  • G. A. Robichaud, Bridge funding: The elucidation of breast cancer signalling circuitry, Beatrice Hunter Cancer Research Institute, Nova Scotia, February 2011, $25 000 (1 year)
  • G. A. Robichaud, RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP: Regulators of breast cancer metastasis, Research Assistantship Initiative, New Brunswick Innovation Foundation (NBIF), February 2011, $10 000 (1 year)
  • G. A. Robichaud, Mapping the Pax-5 cancerous interactome in breast cancer cells, Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR-RPPNB), New Investigator Award, Sept. 2010, $300 000 (5 years)


Research interests

CELLULAR SIGNALLING AND ACTIVATION
Cellular signalling is a phenomenon of importance in multiple areas, including tissue development, endocrinology, immunology, oncology and the neurosciences.

This is because activation of intracellular signalling cascades enables a cell to adapt a gene expression program to environmental signals and stressors. This information network (cellular transduction) is made possible by highly specialized signalling mediators (membrane receptors, kinase proteins, phosphatase proteins, transcription factors, microRNA) that activate gene expression in response to the environment.

Analysis of signalling cascades helps us to understand fundamental processes such as proliferation, differentiation and cell death. These studies also play an important role in clarifying the molecular basis of numerous pathologies and identifying new therapeutic targets. Our laboratory is interested in the signalling pathways responsible for the development and maintenance of various types of cancers.

ROLE OF ONCOGENES IN THE DEVELOPMENT, MAINTENANCE AND PROGRESSION OF TUMOUR CELLS
One of our main research stream is studying the role of certain genes governing cancer growth (oncogenes) and their signalling cascades in oncogenesis phenomena (tumour transformation processes) in human lymphocytic cells (lymphoma) and mammary epithelial cells (breast carcinoma).

One example of our projects is our studies involving the Pax-5 transcription factor, a member of the Pax family of transcription factors, which typically regulate the development of highly specialized tissues and organs.

Pax-5 is an essential element in the development of B lymphocytes. Pax-5 plays a crucial role in the biological processes of B cells. Therefore, a disruption of its expression promotes oncogenesis cascades leading to transformation of normal cells into their cancerous counterpart.

Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that the human Pax-5 gene also has the capacity to generate multiple isoforms (variants) of the Pax-5 protein via alternative splicing mechanisms during transcription. We have also noted that some types of B-cell lymphoma express specific and unique profiles of the various isoforms of the Pax-5 gene. Functional study of one specific Pax-5 isoform has consequently proved difficult since B cells express multiple isoforms simultaneously. We have therefore developed gene suppression systems based on catalytic ribozymes and interfering RNA to attenuate specific expression of the various Pax-5 isoforms in human cells. Using these powerful molecular scissors, we are now able to clarify the specific roles and importance of multiple variants of the Pax-5 protein in biological and tumour processes in human cells.

 

 

 

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 (ACRI) is a non-profit organization founded in late 1998 and housed at the Dr. Georges-L.-Dumont University Hospital Centre in Moncton. Thanks to its unique expertise, ACRI has become a true centre of excellence in cancer research.

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